Stavros' Stuff

Angry rants of programming and other things.

Turning everything into a mobile phone: Redemption

Just puttin' phones in things that don't have phones in them.

If you have been following my erudite writings, you will know that I find great pleasure in taking things that don’t have computers in them and putting computers in them. I put a computer in a doorbell so I can order food, in a LED strip so I can play games better, an RC car so I can map out my living room, a room fragrance sprayer so… I can spray my room with fragrance, etc.

You will, of course, remember the iRotary, an old rotary phone that I turned into an amazing rotary mobile phone. You don’t? Well here it is:


You will also remember the irrigation controller that has the potential to revolutionize agriculture more than the Mesopotamian dude who said “I wonder what will happen if I put a bunch of seeds into the ground” 20,000 years ago but then was too lazy to do it. It probably won’t revolutionize it as much as his brother, who actually did it, but I’ll take what I can get.

Anyway, the problem with those two projects is that they use an Arduino, which is ancient 2014 technology, so they might as well be using a piece of flint on a stick. The iRotary prototype, more specifically, is a bunch of wires that I literally duct-taped on the Arduino because I figured I might want to use the GSM shield again (possibly to make an irrigation controller), so I’ve always wanted to improve on the two.

The obvious improvement would be to design a custom, extensible GSM PCB that I can program and easily solder to other things to make GSM-enabled devices, but who has the will, knowledge or time to do something huge like this? Well, I do, damnit, because I went and learned all these things while somehow managing to trick my girlfriend into believing that yes, I am spending enough time with her.

After the long and excessively meandering introduction, I am ready to take you through the detailed journey of how I made just that: A custom-built, programmable, GSM-enabled PCB, wrote the software for it and now make it available to you for free so you can make your own crap.

Let’s start!

The requirements

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The iRotary Saga

Wherein the rotary phone acquires electronics to connect to the mobile network and can function wholly unmolested

Welcome to part four of the iRotary trilogy! This is the part where we complete the project, along with the OFFICIAL TRAILER at the very end (spoiler alert!).

The original goal of this post was to complete the project, but I have delayed writing it for so long, that I think it would be better if I just started from the beginning, and produced one, cohesive narrative.

As you may remember from part one, I am a very angry person. Especially when talking on the phone, I get easily pissed off, and nowadays there’s no good way to express my frustration. I miss the olden days, where you had a nice physical handset you could slam into the phone to relieve your tension, but mobile phones just don’t provide the same pleasure. Undeterred, I set out to create a rotary phone that was also a mobile phone.

Thus, the iRotary was born.

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iRotary - Part Three

Phone slam 3: The slammening

In part two of project iRotary, we actually got the phone to make calls, but we couldn’t talk or hear the other person. In this part, I promised you some hardcore microphone-to-headset action, and that’s exactly what I won’t deliver!

Instead, what I did was to procure the gorgeous phone you saw in the previous posts. That’s right! All this series so far has been a ruse! I didn’t have that phone to start with, I didn’t have it at all!

However, I do have it now, and I managed to enclose the Arduino in the actual phone. Let’s see how that happened.

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iRotary - Part Two

Working towards a phone I can slam

In part one of project iRotary, we got the Arduino to detect pulses from a rotary dial and turn them into a phone number, all in the name of turning this phone:

into a mobile phone I can use on the go. In part two, we will actually connect the Arduino to a GSM shield and place calls with the rotary dial like it’s 1993. I have seen the future, and it is the past. Read on for details!

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iRotary - Part One

Finally, a phone I can slam again!

Lately, my mobile phone (an HTC One) has become very slow. I think it’s mainly SwiftKey, which is slow like dog, but no matter. As a good consumerist, I must purchase a new phone. However, I am also an angry person, and I sorely miss the tactile sensation of slamming the phone on someone’s face.

Because of this, I decided to put my engineering degree to good use, and went out and bought a phone. Thus begins project iRotary, which aims to turn this:

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